Category Archives: Research

Top Historical Romance Books We Can’t Stop Reading: a guest post by Dating Connections

Top Historical Romance Books We Can’t Stop Reading

 

Whether you’re in a biker dating rut and need some way to keep things interesting, or are a bookworm that’ll read anything and everything, today we present a short yet comprehensive list of historical romance books that are a true hit with their readership!

Javier García, Flickr

Mostly set in England, these novels will keep you on your toes much like Pride & Prejudice – you know Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth have to get together in the end, but it’s all so complicated that it seems impossible! ♥

#1: Outlander Series by Diana Gabaldon

The story of Claire Randall is set in the Scottish Highlands just after WWII. A combat nurse just back from the war, Claire is reunited with her husband, but soon finds herself as a Sassenach – an ‘outlander’ in a war-torn Scotland when she walks through a standing stone in one of the ancient circles that dot the British Isles. Claire discovers that her only chance to stay safe depends on Jamie Fraser, a handsome young soldier who steals her heart. She must find her way through the world of danger, passion, and violence as she is trying to reconcile two irreconcilable lives. One of the most popular historical romances (with a time travel slant) on Goodreads with a score of 4.22 out of 5 based on more than 665,000 ratings, Outlander is an explicit book that uses descriptive, energizing and highly engaging writing.

#2: Westcott Series by Mary Balogh (Someone to Love)

The death of Humphrey Westcott, Earl of Riverdale, leaves behind a fortune and a secret he had kept for so long – a daughter no one ever knew he had. Anna Snow, who grew up as an orphan, learns her father was the late Earl of Riverdale, and she stands to inherit a fortune, but her siblings want nothing to do with her. When the new Earl’s guardian becomes interested in Anna, he assists her with the transformation from an orphan to a lady, stepping in to rescue her only to find himself vulnerable to the feelings he has kept hidden for so long. Someone to Love is the 5th book in a series, but good as a stand-alone as well as evidenced by its rating of 3.8 on Good Reads and plenty of praise.#3: The Hathaways Series by Lisa Kleypas (Mine Till Midnight)

When Amelia Hathaway discovers she’s about to inherit a fortune and find herself in London society, she realizes that tending to her two younger siblings is far easier than navigating the ways of the aristocracy. Matters are further complicated when she falls for a tall, dark, and handsome Cam Rohan, who’s unfathomably rich and tired of society’s petty restrictions. He offers only friendship when Amelia reaches out to him for help, but both are soon tempted by the desire that blindsides them both. Mine Till Midnight scored 4.08 out of more than 50,000 ratings on Goodreads, and it’s perfect for anyone who can’t resist love at first sight!#4: The Brothers Sinister Series by Courtney Milan (The Duchess War)

Minerva Lane is a quiet, bespectacled girl who tries hard not to get anyone’s attention. The last time she was at the center of things she had to change her name to escape her scandalous past. Hence, when a handsome duke comes into town, the last thing she wants is to catch his eye, which is precisely what happens. But Robert Blaisdell, the Duke of Clermont, is no fool, and quickly realizes there is much more to Minnie than she lets on, and once things get heated he discovers that this little shy girl could prove to be more than he can handle. Beloved by its readership with a Goodreads rating of just under 4, The Duchess War is a must for anyone looking for steamy historical fiction.#5: Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

No list on the most popular historical romance books would ever be complete without Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. One of the most popular novels in this genre, Pride and Prejudice tells a story of incredibly stubborn Elizabeth Bennett, one of five sisters who must marry rich to secure their status, who meets just as incredibly arrogant and rich beyond measure Mr. Darcy. Filled with humorous dialogue, this story of courtships draws readers in with inconceivable force, and delivers a very satisfying finale to the delight of all. With more than 2 million ratings on Goodreads, and a score of 4.25 out of 5, even its old English in which it is written can’t take away from the intrigue and the narrative that are absolutely breathtaking.

#6: The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory

Although depicting some historical accuracy peppered with a little drama for good measure, Phillipa Gregory’s The Other Boleyn Girl is a compelling historical novel about two sisters fighting for the affection of the same man, Henry the VIII. When Mary is set off to his court at a tender age of 14, she catches the eye of the powerful king and is soon swept off her feet thanks to his genuine infatuation with her. However, Mary soon realizes she’s a pawn in her family’s scheme to move up the social ladder, and as the king’s interest in her fades, she must step aside for her best friend and mighty rival – her sister Anne. With 4.05 out of 5 on Goodreads, The Other Boleyn Girl is highly praised by its readers for making history so much fun and addictive to read.

Yuri Efremov, Unsplash

Wow! What a great sampling of historical romance books!

Thank you, Dating Connections, for such great tips for our reading lists! ♥♥♥

Guest Blogger Bio

Dating Connections is a site that offers the opportunity for you to explore a variety of dating tips, previous relationship experiences and interact with other people!

Links

Website:  http://datingconnections.org/

Blog:  http://datingconnections.org/category/blog/

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/datingconnections/

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/BoyanUlv

Google+:  https://plus.google.com/u/0/101423157749445118069

 

Thanks again! We hope to see you back on ILRB sometime. 

As always, happy reading, everyone! 😉 Have a great weekend!

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Filed under Blogging, Books, Event, Fiction, Gifts, Guest Writer, Historical, Historical Romance, Message, Readers, Research, Romance, romantic ideas, Stories, Time Travel

Romantic Things to Do in Paris: a guest post by Erica Fleming

City of Love: Romantic Things to Do in Paris

 

Apart from being known for its quite severe history of liberation and revolutions, Paris is an everlasting inspiration for wanderers.

Cédric Klei, Unsplash

No matter how trivial it is, the City of Love has always been and will always be a place of romanticism drawing sweethearts from all over the world to taste the cheeses, hear an accordion playing some ballads and, of course, see the Eiffel Tower.

Louis Pellissier, Unsplash

 

Notwithstanding, Paris is not a one-sightseeing city since the possibilities of having a lovely weekend are vast there. For this, here is a list of top cherry-picks of what to do in Paris that will definitely turn a vacation into a fabulous journey.

Flickr, pexels.com

#1 Observation from the Tower

Even though it’s a heck of a difficulty to get to the top because of the myriads of tourists dashing from all over the globe, paying a visit to the famous Eiffel Tower is a must. The 324-meter beauty gazing upon the ville will give you the most memorable views of the whole trip.  It’s also nice to have a glass of cold sparkling wine in one of the floors’ bars. Furthermore, the peak of the tower is surely the most romantic place to propose or, simply, to take a selfie with almost 20 thousand lights in the background.

#2 Joy at the divine temple

The Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Paris, located in the district of Montmartre, is not only a church that welcomes thousands of worshipers annually but also a place of fabled romantics and outstanding beauty. The temple is situated on a hilltop unfolding its staircase alongside a funicular downwards to the city. White domes with their gracious ornaments and chapels outside and 18th-century frescos inside are sightseeing wonders.

Bui Anh, Unsplash

The district of Montmartre is known to have been a home to many artists and painters starting with the end of the 1700s. Here, one can find a museum established in a mention that centuries ago belonged to an impressionist Renoir and realist Valadon. In the backyard of the museum, there are installations of famous artists.

Then, head to the place des Abbesses where you can find a chart on how to say ‘I love you’ in more than 200 languages and is located on the Wall of Love decorated by modern Parisian artists Baron and Kito.

#3 Romanticism again

Follow a path of tourists a bit to the South, and you’ll find another museum, Museum of the Romantics. This ordinary house with green window shades and a spiral staircase exhibits works of G. Sand, A. Scheffer, L. Hersent, A. Clesinger and many other romanticists.

TripSavvy

Delacroix’s works can be found in his former studio and now an exhibition place, The National Museum of Eugene Delacroix, such as ‘Chios and Missolonghi’ or the ‘Death of Sardanapalus’.

Paris tourist office

If you’re a fan of Notre Dame then the mansion of Victor Hugo is definitely a place to visit for you as well. The place is easily reachable through Parisian narrow alleys and marketplaces where they sell antiques and curiosities.

#4 Secret trails

There are shops and curiosity stores on the right side of the Seine that will absorb you with the 1800s nostalgia.

Dan Novac, Unsplash

In Passage Verdeau one can find worn out by time book library and manuscripts, whereas in Passage Jouffroy there are miniatures and toys.

Passage des Panoramas is the first place in the district to have been given gaslight in the early 19th century. There, at this marketplace, there is a vast range of collectables and antiques (portraits, post stamps or cards, tokens of honor, fabrics, etc.) that will motivate a change of your heart and make you buy at least a wee thing.

Paris tourist office

Also, if you are willing to try a typical cuisine of the 19th century, then head to Le Grand Vefour, where such foods can be discovered.

#5 Following the path of thousands

Canal St-Martin is for sure one of the most impressive places in Paris. It penetrates the city’s main streets and is embroidered with dozens of metal and stone bridges built in the 19th century.

Expedia

You may enjoy the view of one of the bridges open upwards in order to let a ferryboat through, or you can take one of the boats and have a ride in the canal. There, you can either enjoy a traditional French meal or open up a bottle of Champagne as you pass by crowded by tourists streets.

Huy Phan, Unsplash

Or, if water is not an option for you, it’s always possible to get a few things to go in Pink Flamingo and gaze upon the ville on a bridge.

#6 Just the two of you          

In case, if a ferryboat is too crowded and you’re looking for some time to be alone, then it’s always possible to rent a two-person boat at Bateaux Parisiens. Moreover, it’s a fascinating experience to come by the famous garden of Jardin Shakespeare, which accommodates most of the greenery (trees and flowers) from the Bard’s works.

TripAdvisor

#7 The Dinner

It’s inexplicably difficult to find a decent food court in Paris since the majority of places are either fast-food or too fancy for just two tourists. Nonetheless, Les Ombres has an amazing view on the Tower and a beautiful angle for pictures; whereas La Tour d’Argent offers a spacious rooftop for hot nights out, where you can contemplate about your future plans.

Noblesse & Royautés

More romantic than a restaurant with a view on the Eiffel Tower or a rooftop with an open bar can be only a restaurant refurnished in the best fashion of the 17th century with a labyrinth of candles, Le Coupe-Chou. Also, it’s a must to visit Bouillon Racine as a destination of a lovely night out.

TripAdvisor

Or, Le Frank that is located next to the famous Art Centre set up by the Louis Vuitton Foundation.

All in all, Paris is not a one-sightseeing city, such as the Eiffel Tower, but of thousands of places that fable one’s heart, making them wonder if this day can last for good. So pack your bags and prepare for the most extraordinary journey of your entire life!

Pedro Lastra, Unsplash

Nice! These are wonderful tips for those who are thinking about taking a trip to the City of Love. I don’t think you can go wrong here!

Thank you, Erica, for such great advice! ♥♥♥

Guest Blogger Bio

My name is Erica Fleming. I support the effective adoption of new technologies or ways of working within writing by communicating complex information in an informative and inspiring way. My works you can find here. I’m fond of writing articles for students, helping with essays.

Links

Website:  http://sutree.com/

Blog:  http://freebooksummary.com/category/blog

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/EricaFl67487069

 

Thanks again! We hope to see you back on ILRB sometime. 

As always, happy reading, everyone! 😉 Have a great week!

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Filed under Blogging, Contemporary, Dating Tips, Event, Love, Message, Readers, Relationships, Research, Romance, romantic ideas, Tour, travel

How Will Facebook’s Dating Service Work: a guest post by Dating Connections

How Will Facebook’s Dating Service Work?

 

Facebook, the biggest and most popular social network in the world, is launching a brand new dating service. This new feature will definitely attract new users while making current members seeking dates happy. Mark Zuckerberg announced this new feature at the F8, Facebook’s annual developer conference, and the idea was greeted with enthusiasm.

Beiins Nebs, Flickr

The Facebook owner is eager to compete with dating apps such as Tinder and Hinge but in a different way. Zuckerberg says that the Facebook dating app will aim to help its users explore scenes, such as senior dating niche for instance, and find real, long-term relationships. If you’re interested in this new feature, make sure to stick around and see how it will work.

Joining In Will Be Rather Easy

When Facebook first came out with this idea, a lot of users were worried that this new feature will complicate their overall Facebook experience. However, accessing your dating profile will be rather easy. All you’ll have to do is go to your profile page and click the heart-shaped icon in the top right corner of your screen.

Created by Freepik

This will automatically take you to your ‘dating home’, where you’ll be able to browse certain groups and look for other single users.

Dating Profile Will Be Separated From Your Original Account

Setting up a dating account won’t have anything to do with your existing Facebook profile. It will be completely hidden from your Facebook friends, so if you don’t want people to know that you’re using this feature, you will have nothing to worry about. Anything you do on your dating profile including photos, chats, and status updates, won’t appear on the news feed of your original account.

Farica Yang, Unsplash

Also, you’ll be able to choose which information you want to share with your potential dates.

How Will People Find Potential Matches?

First of all, your matches won’t necessarily be your Facebook friends. This new dating service will present its users with a number of events and groups that might interest them based on their likes and the information they entered in their profile. The matching algorithm will take your interests, passions, location, common interests, mutual friends, and similar dating preferences into account. You will be able to ‘unlock’ certain groups and events in your area which will make you visible to other event attendees and group members.

Jacob Postuma, Unsplash

Communication And Safety

Once you find someone you like, you will have the option to click/tap on the ‘interested’ icon which will be located in the bottom right corner of your screen. Also, the chat will be much different than the one on your Facebook profile.

A Woman Sitting on the Floor and Using Laptop

Users will only be able to send text messages and they will be limited to only one initial message. This will prevent scammers, perverts, and frauds from harassing other users with inappropriate content…such as nude photos, for example.

Created by Freepik

According to Mark Zuckerberg and developers, the safety of the users will be their number one priority.

When Will It Be Launched?

There is no specific date just yet, but Mark Zuckerberg is confident that the new feature will be launched by the end of this year. This gives you enough time to prepare and work on your online dating moves.

Created by Freepik

Great! What nice info for anyone willing to get into the new Facebook real dating experience…

Thank you, Dating Connections, for such a wonderful sneak peek! ♥♥♥

Guest Blogger Bio

Dating Connections is a site that offers the opportunity for you to explore a variety of dating tips, previous relationship experiences and interact with other people!

Links

Website:  http://datingconnections.org/

Blog:  http://datingconnections.org/category/blog/

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/datingconnections/

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/BoyanUlv

Google+:  https://plus.google.com/u/0/101423157749445118069

 

Thanks again! We hope to see you back on ILRB sometime. 

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Filed under apps, Blogging, Contemporary, Dating Tips, Event, Love, Message, Readers, Relationships, Research, Romance, romantic ideas

Author Interview on Rachael Stapleton’s blog

Monday, January 12, 2015

Today I’m interviewing bestselling author Marie Lavendar who prefers a gel pen to a keystroke and a journal page to a computer.

When asked if she had any quirks she admitted that while she doesn’t write in the shower, she does find herself working on scenes in there. I had to agree…this happens to me all the time. 

SecondNature-final cover

Desiree Edwards has a problem. She’s been attacked, kidnapped and forced to get along with a vampire of all things. It’s something right out of the story books she reads, or her worst nightmare. But, sometimes he’s not the monster he appears to be. He seems so humanlike that she can’t help it when her emotions betray her, when her body betrays her. To make matters worse, she finds out more about herself than she ever wanted to know.
She was unlike any other…
Alec has a problem. The animal in him wants Desiree. But, so does the man. The more he learns about her, the harder it is to deny what he wants. But, he’s a freak, and she’s just a human. The two species don’t mix that way. Then an old enemy surfaces and Alec is forced to make a choice. His life or hers.

Can Alec’s soul be saved by this unique human? Or will it be far too late?

So, Marie, your book is a love story involving vampires. How did you become “involved” with vampires? 

LOL! That’s funny because my “book boyfriend” is Wrath from J.R. Ward’s Black Dagger Brotherhood Series. But seriously, vampires have always held a fascination for me. Whether they came from movies or books, I was always interested in them. I always wanted to write about them too, and with Second Nature, I got that chance.

What did you enjoy most about writing this book?

The vampire element! It was fun to write about something mythical and to use my own imagination to fill in the details. I’ve read a lot of vampire books; therefore I had a foundation. I just had to make it my own. Of course, I loved and found myself identifying with the characters too.
Are there vocabulary words or concepts in your book that may be new to readers?  Define some of those.

There are a couple of terms. ‘Others’ are supernatural beings, and another term is ‘bloodseer’, but readers won’t see that one until the sequel.
What is the biggest thing that people THINK they know about your subject/genre, that isn’t so?
All I can say is…my vampires don’t sparkle.  Oh, and they don’t sleep in coffins.  LOL.

If you could cast your characters in the Hollywood adaptation of your book, who would play your characters?

For the main characters in Second Nature, I would choose either Henry Cavill or Matt Bomer as Alec, and for Desiree I would probably pick Moon Bloodgood because of her exotic features.
How important are names to you in your books? Do you choose the names based on liking the way it sounds or the meaning? Do you have any name choosing resources you recommend?

I think names are important. Sometimes I choose them because I simply like the name, but mainly I choose a character’s name because it really fits him/her. I have used a baby name book that I own, but I have also used other baby name sources online (http://www.babynames.com/).  The meaning of a name or even its origin can be very significant in some stories so I spend a lot of time on http://www.behindthename.com/ or for last names, I use http://surnames.behindthename.com/. When I write historical romance, I want to be period specific. Often I will just do a search to see what common names were for the time period. With the Heiresses in Love Series, I spent a lot of time looking for both English and French names.

Have you always liked to write?

It seems like I’ve always loved it. I’ve been writing stories since I was nine years old. I’ve never felt more freedom than I do when I’m telling a story.

Do you do a lot of research for your books? Do you enjoy doing research?

Yes, I believe you have to do research for every book. Some, such as historical novels, require more than others. I don’t mind the research portion of writing. It helps me find the answers I need, and sometimes it will even help jar me out of writer’s block.
Is there one subject you would never write about as an author? What is it?

Maybe science fiction. I don’t mind watching the films, but I think I would find it pretty hard to write.
Is there a certain type of scene that’s harder for you to write than others? Love? Action? Racy?

Heavy action scenes can be challenging because I need to really visualize it before I can put it into words. For example, with my last historical romance, Upon Your Honor, I did a lot of study on fencing before I attempted to write the scenes about dueling. I watched fencing videos and I tried to understand and picture the terms they used.
Is this your first book? How many books have you written prior (if any?)

No, it’s not my first book. Other than Second Nature, I have written and published 19 books.
What are you working on now? What is your next project?

Right now, I am working on the final book in the Heiresses in Love Series. It is titled Upon Your Love. I am also perfecting the manuscript for A Little Magick, book two of the Magick Series. For my next project, I will probably finish up Blood Instincts, the sequel to Second Nature.
What made you choose romance as your particular genre? Do you write in other genres?

I guess I just love “love”. That obsession sort of translated into a love for books about love, or romance novels. Even as a young writer, some of my stories tended to have a romantic tone. I poured over romance novels as I grew up (I still do), and it just felt natural to keep writing about romance. Eventually, I started including other elements, which would work for subgenres like historical romance, paranormal romance, romantic fantasy, time travel romance, western romance, contemporary romance and romantic suspense. I have tried writing in other genres, of course. I have written and published mystery/thriller, literary fiction and poetry. Recently, I even wrote a children’s fantasy story.
Where did your love of books/storytelling/reading/writing/etc. come from?

I think from the time that my mom read books to me when I was tiny, I loved books. And then when I learned how to read, it opened up a huge world, a world of wonder that I couldn’t help but immerse myself in. I just loved flipping through tomes from any genre, loved the smell of new and old books and pouring over the words within. Writing, I think, naturally came out of my love of books.
What kind(s) of writing do you do? Just fiction or have you tried other things?

Yes, I also write other things. I write poetry in my free time and, since I’ve been published, I started writing articles for my blogs.

What are some of the references that you used while researching this book?

Since Second Nature is set in Baltimore, I did a lot of research from the city of Baltimore website as well as understanding where everything was through Google maps. Via the city website, I was able to find the best park location for one of the scenes in the book. I did other types of research for Baltimore. I also did research on the Civil War, and found a lot of information on http://www.history.com/ and http://www.civilwar.org/.  It did take me awhile to get access to the Roster of Civil War Soldiers, though.
Who are some of your favorite authors that you feel were influential in your work?  What impact have they had on your writing?

Both Catherine Coulter and Nora Roberts definitely influenced me. Catherine made me love historical romance, and Nora Roberts taught me to be fearless about any topic while writing.

What did you find most useful in learning to write?  What was least useful or most destructive?

I studied Creative Writing in high school and college. There are several elements I always use. I have to agree with 1) constructing three-dimensional and believable characters. 2) Start a story “en media res”, or in the middle of things, or mid-action. 3) Oh, and don’t kill off main characters. This is a failing I have seen not only in movies and television, but also in books. It is shocking to the reader, and can ruin the whole story in most cases.  I have seen only a few authors pull it off well, and only because the death was necessary for a major plot element.

So, all of these were helpful guidelines. I think the most useful thing was simply the freedom to write what you wanted, what your heart was telling you. The writing community as a whole is pretty supportive, and having that is important to writers at any stage. Any feedback I received in workshops only helped to make my stories better. The same goes for any time I use beta readers or critique partners now.

I think that the most destructive thing to tell a writer is to rewrite something. What was it that our English teachers told us all through school when we were writing essays or research papers? “Revise, revise, revise.” That is a far better strategy because even if you have one terrible paragraph, you can always use parts of it to improve what you have. The idea of starting from scratch is a far more daunting task, and can make it that much easier to give up on writing in general. A smart writer will start to see what is wrong with the paragraph and how they can adjust it. That’s what editing is, and it’s a very necessary instrument in a writer’s toolbox.
Are you a full-time or part-time writer?  How does that affect your writing?

Part-time for now, though I’d love to do it full-time. It can be a real challenge finding the time to write, but I just push myself to get something done every day, despite the distractions in my life.
For those interested in exploring the subject or theme of your book, where should they start? 

Start with the paranormal or urban fantasy genre. There are a lot of unique spins on the world of vampires, shifters, etc. I would suggest books by J.R. Ward, Kerrelyn Sparks, Chloe Neill and P.C. Cast as well as any other authors in the genre.
Do you write more by logic or intuition, or some combination of the two? 

I guess it would be a combination of the two. Intuition helps with writing some scenes, and then logic helps me figure out the wording or if I need to stop and do research in order to continue writing the manuscript.

What do you like to read in your free time?

I love reading paranormal, historical and contemporary romance novels. Recently, I have been reading more paranormal, but I will probably go back to historical soon.
What projects are you working on at the present?  

As aforementioned, I’m working on Upon Your Love, which will be the third and final book of the Heiresses in Love Series. This is a Victorian romantic suspense, and I am excited to show the book to readers! On the side, I am also working on Blood Instincts, which will be book two of the Blood at First Sight Series.

What do your plans for future projects include?

I have a ton of works in progress. There is a romantic suspense collaboration called Certain Death, and that is with another writer. There will probably be at least two books in that series. I also plan to re-release all of my self-published books under this pen name. A big future project I have in mind is called the Witches of Moonhaven Series, a set of six books about a coven of witches around the time of the Salem witch trials. I have other ideas as well, so I doubt I’ll ever have a problem coming up with what’s next.

How on earth do you start writing one of your stories or books? What is your process during the course of writing?

My ideas come to me randomly, and the scenes pop into my head in any order. This causes the story to become a puzzle I need to piece together and once I start the plotting portion of the book, I can work at making it seamless.

Purchase Links:

Universal Amazon: http://bookgoodies.com/a/B00Q7FWIWA

Publisher: http://solsticepublishing.com/second-nature/

Barnes & Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/second-nature-marie-lavender/1120879883

CreateSpace link: https://www.createspace.com/5131233

Book Trailer

Mariepic2 - small

Marie Lavender lives in the Midwest with her family and three cats. She has been writing for over twenty years. She has more works in progress than she can count on two hands. Marie has published twenty books in the genres of historical romance, contemporary romance, romantic suspense, paranormal romance/fantasy, mystery/thriller, literary fiction and poetry. Lavender just released Second Nature, a paranormal romance/urban fantasy, in December of 2014. She released Magick & Moonlight, a romantic fantasy, back in March. Upon Your Honor, released in late April, is her second historical romance. Her current series are The Heiresses in Love Series, The Magick Series and The Blood at First Sight Series. Feel free to visit her website at http://marielavender.com/ for further information about her books and her life. Marie is also on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and LinkedIn.

Bestselling author of UPON YOUR RETURN and 19 other books. 2014 BTS Red Carpet Review Nominee. Finalist and Runner-up in the MARSocial’s Author of the Year Competition. Honorable mention in the January 2014 Reader’s Choice Award. Liebster Blogger Award for 2013 and 2014. Top 50 Authors on AuthorsDB.com. Winner of the Great One Liners Contest on the Directory of Published Authors.

A list of her books and pen names are as follows:

Marie Lavender: Upon Your Return; Magick & Moonlight; Upon Your Honor; Second Nature

Erica Sutherhome: Hard to Get; Memories; A Hint of Scandal; Without You; Strange Heat; Terror in the Night; Haunted; Pursuit; Perfect Game; A Touch of Dawn; Ransom; Leather and Lace

Kathryn Layne: A Misplaced Life

Heather Crouse: Express Café and Other Ramblings; Ramblings, Musings and Other Things; Soulful Ramblings and Other Worldly Things

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Filed under Authors, Books, Contemporary, Fantasy, Fiction, Interview, Paranormal/Urban Fantasy, Readers, Research, Romance, Writing, Writing Tips

Guest Post: Why Research Is Important and How to Do It (Marie Lavender)

Check out my article on how to do research with your writing today on Belinda Y. Hughes’ blog!

Belinda Y. Hughes: Writing, Editing & Social Media

Impreial Federation c maps bpl org Image credit http://maps.bpl.org

When my friend Belinda suggested the topic of how to do your homework when writing historical romances, I thought I’d take it a step further since I have done all kinds of research in my writing career.  Research is a dual-edged sword.  It can be a total blast if you’re into learning about new things.  On the other hand, it can be a real pain when it’s difficult to find the right information.  No matter what stage of writing you’re at, you will, at some point, need to look something up.

First of all, let me get the big question out of the way, the one I was arrogant enough to ask myself so many years ago.  This coming from someone who wasn’t a fan of history class, but loved reading historical romance.  Cue the irony.

“Why is research so important?”

Indeed!  Why should we go to…

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Filed under Authors, Books, Fiction, Historical Romance, Research, Romance, Uncategorized, Writing, Writing Tips